WHAT I’VE LEARNED ABOUT LIFE BY WATCHING PEOPLE DIE

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Death is a fearful word,but inevitable.

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“The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.”

Mark Twain

I was a child the first time I saw a man die. I don’t remember the event as particularly traumatic. The man was a stranger and I watched the tragedy unfold through a window, the glass glaring the line between reality and fantasy and giving the sensation of watching a particularly disturbing television program. While swimming in the basement pool of our apartment block my father, sister and I noticed a group of 3 people sleeping on the private dock outside the building. We saw the beer bottles and noted that all three were in their underwear and figured they were just “sleeping it off”. My father ran outside after one man got up, stumbled to the end of the dock and got into the…

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Amaryllis

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Its simply amazing piece of prose.The words draw you into a world of your own

Intensify It

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‘I don’t want to tell you who I am,’ she whispers just as I’m thinking how much I want her to keep talking. I want her to talk to me until I know enough to make her the main character of a novel I’d never even thought of before her.
‘You don’t have to,’ I say, ‘but I would love to discover you.’
‘Create me, then.’
She takes my hand and wraps it around her waist, and as I hold her I think that maybe this girl shouldn’t be out there. I shouldn’t think of her as a character, artistic as that might be. She doesn’t need to belong to the world. She doesn’t even have to belong to me. Some paintings aren’t meant to be exposed, they’re only meant to express something. To keep flirting with God’s masterpiece feels almost embarrassing. I just want to capture her essence and remember it forever; but…

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Custody by Manju Kapur

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This is my first book by the author. And I must say that the book held me captive from the first page. She explores very emotional topics with much fervor.

In today’s society divorce and fight for child custody is a common scenario. Manju Kapur has been described as the great chronicler of the modern Indian family. Thus, her book Custody presents a riveting story of how a loving family falls apart at the seams and all that is left is an emotional and spite-filled battle between the parents for the hearts and souls of their children.
Story: Raman and Shagun have a perfect marriage in the eyes of the society.  He is a market executive at a global drinks company. She is extraordinarily beautiful. But the reality is far from what is shown by the couple. The two are blessed with a son and daughter – life is complete, so to speak. However, things change dramatically when Shagun is introduced to Ashok, Raman’s boss. The loving couple are reduced to spiteful and malicious enemies as they battle for custody of their children. As the children’s lives are thrown upside down, they are forced to negotiate and come to terms with their new circumstances with very little real support from the adults in their lives.Thrown into the puzzle is Ishita – a young woman who has been kicked out of the family she married into because she cannot bear children. Desperate for a husband and child, Ishita will do anything to achieve this. The novel – as it travels through the lives of its characters becomes murkier and also offers a brutal critique of the Indian judicial system that often left me feeling completely hopeless at the forces that come into play and almost whimsically decide the fate of two very innocent children.

What stands out particularly in this novel is Raman’s anguish and anger at the betrayal he experiences at the hands of his worldly wife. Kapur presents him to us with empathy and meticulous attention to detail.Her attention to male characters comes out of her desire to be as balanced as possible in her writing. It is a notable trait of all her work that despite their astute social and political commentary, Kapur avoids making moral judgments about what she is writing about.

Kapur’s writing makes you ponder on certain questions: What does it mean to be a mother? Is a mother a bad mother if she chooses to seek her own happiness? Can a mother be replaced by a mother figure? Is a mother entitled to her children’s love if she is physically separate from them? Though divorce is not uncommon in Asian society today, but in an Indian setting, seems more complicated by the roles of the extended family members- the in-laws with bitter recriminations, the doting grandparents who are denied their weekly feeding sessions, the cousins who seem to be perfectly happy, the lawyer-relative who is caught between legalities and emotional outbursts…..everyone has an opinion. All the adults seem to have forgotten about the child’s inner turmoil; and to me that was exactly what Kapur is trying to convey.

Kapur through her novel opens forth a panorama of the society’s attitudes towards several issues:  infertility is to cast out a wife if she is barren. The fixation with warranting a lady is married and settled, as a yardstick to measure her happiness which filters down to parental compulsion and feeling of low self-esteem. This recurring theme -of what will people say, what will people think is an inherent feature of Asian societies everywhere.

Custody is a novel filled with layers of social and personal commentary that never seeks to judge people’s choices but to illuminate how social values, personal character traits and the legal system can all influence people’s lives in certain ways.

Lanka’s princess: Kavita Kanè

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Lanka's Princess

Lanka’s princess by Kavita Kanè is about Surpanakha and how individual choices and mistakes they lead to can shape the destinies of those associated with us.

My memory and knowledge of Surpanakha is dependent on the reading of Ramayana while in school , and watching the epic serial on Doordarshan. Even then I was struck by the independent streak in her and thought that the punishment meted out to her was very harsh in comparison to her offence. So when I came across this book my curiosity knew no bounds.

It is an epic task to write a mythological fiction from the point of view of a character who has been maligned and vilified as an ugly monster. All knowledge about her is just that she is Ravan’s sister and when she is disfigured by Lakshman , a war is waged to avenge the act. The essence of the book is the choice Surpanakha makes and the unfolding of the events thereafter. Our choices define which part of our nature we allow to rule our minds. And that is the poignant within each of us. A small anecdote from the Puranas would make it clearer.

When the world was being created, the Devas and Asuras went to Sage Prajapati to understand the meaning of Atman, or the self. The first answer that he gave was a simple one. The Asuras accepted it and left with the confidence that they now had the power to use this knowledge as a weapon. But the Devas, led by Lord Indra were not satisfied with the answer. They kept cross-questioning the sage trying to grasp the complete significance and debating the ideas. This small anecdote from the Puranas defines the essence of an Asura – impatient, hungry for power and impulsive. One can also conclude from here that there is an Asura and a Deva within each of us. There is an Asura which always hungry and never satiated and a Deva which keeps questioning so as not to to be distracted fro the right path. It is our choice of the self that determines the events in our life.

The book opens with Krishna, who upon seeing Kubja, the hunchbacked woman of Mathura, recognises her as a reincarnation of Surpanakha. He reveals to her that he himself is Ram, now born as Krishna and has come to her to rectify the grave misdeed he committed in his previous life – of rejecting her. He begins to narrate Surpanakha’s story from the time she was born as the youngest child of Rishi Vishravas and his second wife Kaikesi. She was born Meenakshi – the one with the fish-shaped eyes. Since her birth she is rejected by her mother as an ugly and useless being. Her life as a kid at her father, Rishi Vishravas’ ashram was desolate, where she is neglected and overshadowed by her brothers. Even as Lanka’s Princess,she is again neglected and side-lined; It is only when she weds and becomes a wife and a mother does she find love and a sense of belonging.

And when all that is lost all that is left behind is simmering angst and bitterness. The later incidents and experiences keep fueling her inner desire for revenge, even at the cost of those few that she loves. She sets into motion the events that finally lead to Lanka’s war and the downfall of her entire race.

Alongside, there is unraveling of events leading to the rise of Ravan as King of Lanka and the ensuing effect it brings on his family, more predominantly Surpanakha’s life. The reader may sympathize with her for being the neglected child, while at the same time despising her for her vengeful tactics. The author portrays her not as a good or bad character, but simply as a misunderstood woman who, in her own eyes, is merely righting the wrong done to her when her one chance at happiness has been taken away.

The timeline is fast and keeps readers on tenterhooks such that you do not lose interest. In true Ramayana style, the author raises underlying questions about right and wrong, good and evil, gender discrimination, and women’s rights. An example of this is the confrontation between Surpanakha and Sita. The very attempt by Surpanakha to tempt Ram was unbeknownst at that time where women were not expected to be sexually active and and open about their own desires. Her boldness is a stark opposite to Sita’s meekness and it comes across vividly in every page where she clearly expresses her desires.

To summarize, Lanka’s Princess may be a mythological retelling of events. However in today’s day and age, when women are still subjected to various forms of discrimination, the author puts the spotlight on a woman’s individuality, her sensuality and sexuality, her choices and her desires, which the society wishes to keep hidden behind curtains.

As one reads the book, one cannot help but ponder whether we happen to identify the Asuras and Danavas that exist among us in the form of molesters, murderers, rapists, thieves, etc. Can we look into the mirror and see ourselves as we truly are, not black or white, but grey also when the demons within us shouts ‘tit-for-tat’ when faced with discord.  What Lanka’s Princess will leave you with is a food for thought. You will spend days thinking whether Ram and Lakshman have been on a pedestal due to worth or the male dominated society list virtues only for womenfolk to follow.

 

 

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Chokher Bali: Rabindranath Tagore

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This book has been under my radar ever since I was a school girl. And I have wanted to read it as it is renowned as one of the masterpieces of Tagore. But before reading I decided to do a background check because it was written some 100 years back at a time when women were relegated to the background as homemakers and mere decorative dolls adorned with jewels to be displayed as an asset. That time widow remarraige was a cardinal sin and widows lived as outcastes.

‘Choker Bali’ was first published as a serial in the periodical Bangladarshan from 1902 to 1903. In 1903, it was published as a book. In its preface, Tagore wrote:

“The literature of the new age seeks not to narrate a sequence of events, but to reveal the secrets of the heart. Such is the narrative mode of Choker Bali.”

The translation I read is by Radha Chakravarty. In the light of the preface I was expecting to read the inner working of the heart. And what I read completely blew my mind. I am not an apt person to be giving a review about such a great author, hence here i am honestly giving only my views about the books.

‘Choker Bali’ literally means ‘a grain of sand in the eye’.  Used as a metaphor for a relentless irritating presence, the title beautifully sums up the story about the bond between the two female protagonists, around whom the whole story is woven. The cover of the book is also  thoughtfully designed, with a subtle suggestion of sensuousness, a thread which runs throughout the story also. Radha Chakravarty with her skillful translation puts the setting and characters into context, and bridges the gap of the century between the writing and the re-telling.

Book: After its release the novel was heralded as the ‘Modern Indian Novel’ as Tagore chose to write about the women characters and their desires. A topic which was left untouched due to fear of society and its lack of sanction to such topics.As such there seems to be no plot when one reads the novel, but a deeper reading reveals otherwise.

Binodini is a convent educated young widow left to fend on her own when her husband dies soon after they are married. As was the custom in British India, she returns to her village and lives there for a couple of months until she accepts the invitation of Rajalakshmi (her mother’s friend) to live with her and her son, Mahendra (who had earlier rejected a marriage proposal with her) in Calcutta. He is newly married to Ashalata (a naive, gentle girl), and seeing the conjugal bliss of the two ignites the repressed sexuality in Binodini, who ponders over how this house, this mother-in-law, this Mahendra, the bedroom could all be hers. Deprived of the love, and jealous of what Ashalata gets from Bihari thakurpo (who she was supposed to marry) and Mahendra (who dearly loves Asha), Binodini is determined to break her family as she attracts Mahendra to herself. However, when she gets to know his true nature that he loves no one else except himself, and would fly away as soon as he senses danger, she seeks the love of Bihari Babu, who himself was denied love when he was supposed to get married to Ashalata.

The story weaves further the relationships of these three and Mahendra’s best friend, Bihari, as they deal with issues like distrust, adultery, lies, and problems between the four main characters.

It is contentious as to who is the main protagonist of the story. Tagore originally wrote the story with the working title, ‘Binodini’, which probably means that he meant the story to revolve around her. However, the fact that he changed the title to ‘Choker Bali’ – a phrase which Binodini chooses to represent the bond between herself and Asha, suggests that both women are the focus of the story, and to also appease the moral guardians of the time.

Binodini is obviously one of the strongest characters. She is well read, proficient in household tasks, is beautiful, as well as a model of perfection. Yet, her being a widow keeps her secluded and away from every temptation. It is foreseeable that a lonely woman who reads as much, and as varied stuff as Binodini would be tempted to put her ruses to work, to test her power over people, to feel the passion she so craves to experience.

Asha is her complete opposite – meek, simple, illiterate, and unable to run a house like Mahendra’s. She has no control over the turn events in her own life – whether it her life with her relatives, or her marriage to Mahendra, or her inability to handle the situation at Mahendra’s house – be it his passion or his mother’s antagonism.

Between the two women, it is Binodini we feel more attracted to. After all, a woman who takes her life into her own hands is to be appreciated and encouraged. Yet, it is Asha, who, towards the end of the book, comes across as the stronger one. She is the one who handles the situation with a courage, which seems to come from nowhere. And yet, when you think of the lives of Indian women, it is not unfathomable. Even the meekest of women gets courage, when she is left with nothing more to lose. The fact that this situation only comes when she loses all she has, speaks more of our society than anything else.

After the reading I wondered if Tagore always meant  for Asha to grow like she did. Or, did she surprise him too, and develop over the period of his writing?

With such strong female characters, the males seemed to be mere props for the story. Yet the story would be incomplete without them ass they are the reasons for the thoughts, temptations, conflicts and clashes. And they are the weakest among all. They neither have the courage to stand up to their principles, nor the grace to retreat from the scene silently. Their very presence only intensifies the situation, sparking more discord and trouble. Between the two male characters, Bihari is the more evolved. Mahendra is the very essence of the Indian male so prevalent even today – spoilt and egotistical.

The book though set in the 1900’s can give any of the contemporary authors a run for their money. At the core of it ,it delves into many aspects of relationships & how a single wrong decision can topple an otherwise peaceful life. There might be temptations enough but are they worth spoiling so many lives? Is jealousy a strong enough emotion to forget all other ties & relationships? The book delves into these many questions & more. It has an innocence, loyal friendship and an unadulterated flavor of love & relationship which is rare to find these days and is not written about in today’s world.

The only disappointment I felt after reading was the ending. After having created such a fierce and independent character Binodini, the end she faces is not apt if one reads from present scenario. But the book being set in the early 1900 had to end in the way it did. But Tagore did face severe criticism for the treatment meted out to Binodini.  In 1940, in a magazine named ‘Kabita’, renowned poet Buddhadeb Basu criticized the just-published novel ‘Chokher Bali’. He wrote, “I can’t believe, this great novel, in the last page, dragged to such a forced and imposed ending. It rendered the total writing lifeless.” Tagore, after reading this criticism, wrote to Buddhadeb accepting his inability to end the epic in a more subtle way, and said “I regret the ending now… you are right. It’s my right punishment to be scolded for such ending.”

But who can stand against the society and expect to be heard!!!!

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Are school librarians valued in India today?

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While looking up on books for professional reading I came upon a wonderful resource-The Indispensable Librarian by Doug Johnson. It is immensely useful and beneficial for taking guidance for managing an effective school library program.

It is while going through the book and having visited the author’s blog that certain questions came to me while taking a regular library lesson. Doug has asked the questions in his blog and I too am just voicing my opinion about the same. In his blog (http://doug-johnson.squarespace.com/) he questions: “… it’s only fair to ask if libraries, library programs, and librarians will be around long enough to make such a reading worth your time.” And like him my answer is also a yes. But a weak yes. You may ask why?

I work as a librarian in an Indian school where the position of a school librarian is yet to develop from the status of a bookkeeper. And it’s not just the authority to blame. There are still librarians who are complacent in their place and do not desire a growth for themselves. Information explosion has not made them look up from their seats and the see the various roles that we can now play. The roles that not only enrich us professionally but also give a fulfilment within. Sadly, there aren’t many takers of this and so books that can help develop skills to make an efficient school library program are not treasured yet. Hence the weak yes.

Having worked with schools with different curricula like CBSE, IGCSE and IB, I saw a stark difference in the way the role of a librarian is perceived. Not all CBSE schools give their librarians the scope for development since they are overworked. Being a part of administrative staff, librarians perform duties other than the library profile which takes away time from their work. They are understaffed and thus he/she does not have time to develop a library program or even organise engaging activities. They are given board duties, invigilation work and other such works without a thought that the work of a librarian is specialised and that it cannot be performed by anyone else.  The very essence of a library period is lost when students are sent for substitution to library in the absence of a teacher. CBSE schools are yet to recognise the strengths of a librarian in curriculum and project designing. Ver few school engage a librarian in department meetings when syllabus is discussed. The use of library is restricted to reading and research. What they fail to see is that library can become the hub of the school if given a chance. But for that librarians should be allowed time to do so and not be scattered into different directions as need be.

And yet there are schools and librarian who show a way for the others like G D Goenka school library and Ms. Madhu Bhargava, the librarian who also happens to be the Director of IASL, which has a comprehensive school library program that not only engages the readers but also teaches students about information literacy, plagiarism, intellectual property rights, etc. She has developed lessons to integrate classroom teaching with the library lessons by way of Collaborative planning and teaching, develop curriculum contents by interacting with international communities and also train the teachers to use web tools and integrate in teaching. So, the students and teachers are Digital citizens as well. In the same lines, we have S. L Faisal from Kendriya Vidyalaya, Pattom, a beacon of how library can be developed into a hub. A visit to the blog gives you glimpse into what potential a library holds, if only right opportunity and support is provided.

I call myself a novice in technology integration as I have a long walk ahead. I have just tasted a drop in the ocean. Our names have now changed to Information specialist, Library media specialist, Information manage, etc. Thus, we all need to adapt to changes in technology to keep ourselves updated and well-informed. It is our responsibility to create and mentor effective library programs in our respective schools.

But the impact and influence of the program is our sole responsibility. There is need devote more time on effective promotion and evolving extensive ownership of the library program. We all know that our roles keep evolving just like the physical facilities, our areas of knowledge, our collections will become more heterogenous, and the services by the school library will also be different each year.

Here comes the second question Doug Johnson has asked in his blog: “So a second question then comes up: Will our libraries be so changed from what we now consider libraries will they still continue to be called libraries.”

And I echo the YES, he provided in his blog. It has become a motto for me to better my services as a librarian and yet not be limited in any means. The answer is:

“If, we maintain the core values that will transcend the specifics of library programming.”  In rather very simple words he has summarised the key to a successful library program.

I have often heard remarks that librarians would soon be redundant with the emerging technology. To these I answer, we have Google, but for a person to arrive at the information he/ she is looking they need a librarian to train them to be critical thinkers and search for relevant information. Otherwise there is every chance of drowning in the ocean of information. We are yet to receive the acceptance and recognition for all the behind the scene work.

In India, the position of a school librarian is very side-lined. It is very rarely looked upon with respect. The wealth hidden in the potential of a librarian is yet to be mined in the schools. Little is done besides the regular lending and borrowing. We are taught Ranganathan’s five laws of library science. But very little is taught on the application of the same in a school scenario.

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There is no help or training provided as to how one is to apply the rules in a school set-up. So, I have been on the lookout for the basic core of librarianship and how it stands in a school environment. Doug in his blog has listed the enduring central or “core” values of librarianship as identified by long-time academic librarian and past ALA president Michael Gorman. (Gorman, 2000). These values stand the storm even though the impact of technology can be heavily felt:

  1. Stewardship
  2. Service
  3. Intellectual Freedom
  4. Rationalism
  5. Literacy and learning
  6. Equity of access to recorded knowledge and information
  7. Privacy
  8. Democracy

These core values may or may not summarise everything but they do provide me a starting point to analyse my own core values as a school librarian. Keeping in mind the Five laws of Library science I embrace:

  1. The primary objective of a school library is to help a child to become a thinker and develop his/ her own views about the world. They are not to be taught what to think, rather How to think. And this is achieved when they can have opinions and not be agreeable to all.
  2. Every child is unique and comes from varied cultural, social and economic background. Thus, their individuality is to respected to help them become better library users.
  3. It is of utmost priority to teach children to honour and respect their privacy and that of others as well.
  4. The ability to find, evaluate, organize, synthesize and communicate information is a basic skill for every child. (Doug Johnson)
  5. Reading skills are best developed when a child voluntary reads through personal interest and is not coaxed. Hence, the job of librarian to help a reader find his/ her book.
  6. Every child is must be taught the skills and sensibilities of digital citizenship. (Doug Johnson)
  7. The success of a library is determined by the services provided to the students and how much they benefit from it.
  8. The skills taught and resources provided by the library program are critical to a free society.
  9. Information in all formats should be treated equally and a child’s preference for the same is to be respected.

Striving to achieve this in the Indian schools is like climbing uphill. The lack of support and understanding makes it difficult to explain the roles a librarian can play in a school and enhance the learning and teaching process. Collaboration between teachers and librarians are unheard of. There is so much that we could bring to the classroom if only given a chance to step out of the island we are closed in. We have been branded Teacher- librarian, but how many of us have really given a lesson in a class. And nowadays without understanding the real value of a librarian there are institutions who are employing technology experts and not people with library background. But can these experts answer the questions Doug Johnson has put: Who will fight for information access for all students? Who will fight for intellectual freedom? Who will be concerned about the privacy rights of students and faculty? Who will insist that information literacy is right of every child?”  They may value these but unlike librarians will it be their principal task? A librarian is not just a bookkeeper, given the provision and occasion to display their knowledge and expertise and help make school libraries the heart of every organisation.

Credits:

Gorman, Michael .Our Enduring Values: Librarianship in the 21st Century, Chicago: American Library Association, 2000. Gorman.

Johnson, Doug. The Indispensable Librarian, Linworth Publishing, Incorporated; 2nd Revised edition edition, 2013.

Blog: http://doug-johnson.squarespace.com/

 

Beyond books and walls: What it takes to be a 21st century school librarian

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From connecting with parents and students to keeping up with the latest technologies, there is a whole lot more to the job than stamping due dates and lending books.

A few days ago, while going back home in metro, a fellow female passenger and I got talking. And in between the talk we shared what we do for a living. The moment I said I worked as librarian in a school, she smiled blissfully and remarked that I was lucky to have such a relaxed and comfortable job. Upon hearing this I asked what she meant by her remark. Lo and behold! what I heard next was just the stereotype people possess of the nature of a librarian’s job. For her all I, did was lend books to students in school and shush them when they talk. And the most painful was that I get to sit all day in a comfortable chair with tea on the side. Really!!!!

Is that how I work? Well my friend the answer is no. I do not get to sit on a chair or sip tea all day. Leave alone rest. My day does not merely involve stamping books. I do much more and I am proud of it. I did not choose this job so that I would be having an easy work to do. And yet who am I to get upset because if I stopped the next person walking by on the street and asked them what our jobs as librarians involve, I’d be willing to bet that their first answer would be stamping books. This is because the experience you all had of librarians is of the frontline, the old lady with glasses who kept books locked in cupboards and looked down upon you if your shoes so much as even squeaked. But dear friends have you ever spared a thought how the books get on to the shelves and ready for you to borrow? There is no magic behind it, but behind the scenes there are teams of librarians working to make this happen in universities and colleges. But in schools the job is carried out single handily by the librarian, or if the school infrastructure supports he/ she might have an assistant. Other than that, we ourselves do all the behind the scene from selecting the books for purchase, to processing the orders and later create the bibliographic records that make it possible for you to find the book in the library catalogue and then on the shelves.

I am not here to glorify my job or to argue. I only want you all to see us in the true light. For years, we have plodded to receive the status we enjoy now. And a lot of hands have worked towards making this job reach a level where we are not lesser than our teaching counterparts. No, I have no issues against. I have been a teacher myself, but it is disheartening to see them remark about the librarians’ job as being a job that requires no specific qualification or specialisation and can be done anyone. I was horrified when they said that it’s a job anyone can do effortlessly as there is no level expertise needed.

And the expression was priceless when I informed that we do possess degrees to qualify as a librarian. Not many of my teacher friends were aware. And that’s the level of ignorance behind one of the oldest professions. The fault lies on our part as well because many librarian do not engage themselves beyond books and thus the stereotype continues.

But for me books are only one aspect of what libraries and librarians are about. Librarianship is a people profession. Our job is to connect people with the information they are seeking, whatever format that may take. At their heart, all library jobs have a central purpose: to help people access and use information, for education, for work, or for pleasure. In all library roles, irrespective of place and institution, customer service and communication skills are important. If anyone ever thought they’d become a librarian because they liked books or reading, they would be disillusioned if they did not also like people too. Libraries of all kinds are keen to demonstrate their value to as wide an audience as possible, and to open access to all significant resources that they hold.

In the digital age, with information explosion becoming a common term and every information becoming available online, there is a proclivity to say that libraries and librarians are redundant. But this is not the case. Information available online is often of dubious origin and there is still a wealth of information behind paywalls that can only be accessed by those who have paid. I have helped many students and teachers who have used search engines for their research and projects and come to the library perplexed because they cannot find the information they want or are rather baffled by the overflow of information pertaining to a topic. If anything, the internet has added to the range of services libraries provide and in turn this has also increased the variety of roles available to librarians.

As well as being good communicators with people and dynamic adopters and exploiters of technological developments, librarians need to have detailed specialist subject knowledge to pass on to library users. Our job now includes providing training to show people how to search for information and evaluate the same. These information skills sessions are now expanding to include digital literacies such as cyber safety, the use of social media sites and online collaboration tools.

There is no standard route into librarianship: librarians have first degrees across the whole spectrum of subjects. To become a professionally qualified librarian we also need a masters qualification in librarianship or information science. An introduction to librarianship can be gained through a graduate degree.  A year as a graduate trainee can be useful but it is not a requirement for a place on a postgraduate programme.

I have a job that goes beyond the school walls as I am in constant touch with teachers and students as and when they need any help. As a librarian, my job requires that I be available to them as much as possible. Last month I gave a workshop on Referencing and Citation. This required me to do a lot of reading and research so that the information I communicated was accurate and current. After the research, I was engaged in assembling the information and resources I gathered. Presentations and handouts were prepared keeping in mind the guidelines and student friendly. It took me weeks to prepare for it, as my mistake would cause the students lose marks in their research work. And people consider my job to be cakewalk.

My intention is not to belittle the teaching profession. But friends please be considerate when you happen to meet a librarian. We are not sitting idle all day. The 21st century librarian is more like an information officer who needs to updated and always abreast with the latest in information, books and technology. And this necessitates that we read and keep ourselves up on our surrounding. Nevertheless, we keep doing our work behind the curtains, but it does hurt when people deride our work. Every profession has its share of hardships and bounty, but it is not often that we give each their due.

Yes, teachers have lesson plans to prepare, report cards to write and much more. But we, the librarian work no less. We too have classes but our teaching is not limited to curriculum. We act as aide to your teaching and assist the students study and evaluate information, build up on knowledge and open the horizons for you. Just like your work, our work also requires hours of planning and hard work. Like preparing reading lists, deciding on age appropriate resources for their projects, guiding them in selection of collaboration tools and technology best suited for their need. And this is not easy for us. It involves lot of enquiry, research and assembling of information from the ocean to find that one drop that would quench the need of the user.

We have moved beyond books and walls, and moved ahead, just as information is not limited to books anymore. Our names have changed also, we are called information officer, information specialist, teacher librarian, information and media specialist, and many more. And with the change in the names our role and duty have also changed, become more extensive. We perform research, evaluation, investigation, exploration, curation, referencing, examination. I could go on and the list would only get longer. With the transformation in education system and advancements in technology, our jobs have evolved to extend beyond books. My job is not limited to stamping alone, I am an information officer trying my best to help students search information and evaluate its authenticity and suitability for their work.

So, friends I am not just a librarian, I am the librarian who works behind the scene to ensure you get what you come looking for. The next time you visit a library do pass a smile and give a second to appreciate our work.

Spook Fest

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Booooo ! Yikes ! Eeeeeeeyyaaahhhhh !

You must be thinking what are all these sounds. Well , there were so many ghosts and goblins that it was natural to be scared. Ghost? you ask. Yes, because we at the library celebrated  “Spook Fest” from 24th-27th October to celebrate Halloween. Invites were sent out the week before and personal invites were given to all the heads.

A host of activities were planned for all classes during library like mazes, word search and crosswords. Not to leave behind our national festival we decorated the library for Diwali as well, and had worksheets for both festivals. To ensure that no one is left behind special worksheets were designed and kept for SEN students. The whole library was engaged in creating an unforgettable experience. Bhuwan Sir and Banshi Sir along with the support staff helped adorn the LRC for both the festive looks.

There were two competitions: Cryptographs and Greeting cards (using pages from discarded books) organized for the students. For the teachers, there was Rephrase the sentences (Containing idioms and phrases). Posters were placed all over the school to inform the students about the same.

Since day one, there was lots of excitement around the event. Worksheets were distributed based on Diwali and Halloween during regular library classes. These were taken care of by Banshi Sir. Those interested in attempting the Cryptographs approached Bhuwan Sir as he was handling their queries, and collected the completed worksheets. Some fun masks were also placed for getting pictures clicked.

We saw a lot of teachers bringing their classes to be part of the fest. Brigitte Ma’am brought her class and there was fun in learning as she taught French words relating to Halloween. Following suite were Ms. Archana Verma, Ms. Akanksha Malik, Ms.Supriya Khanna, Ms.Vaishali Thapa, Ms. Vidhi , Ms. Rekha Singhal, Ms.Aarti  and Ms.Sudeshna . They all actively took part with their class in solving the worksheets and participated in Greeting card competition. We had Ms. Namita Shah, Ms. Pujya Ghosh and Ms. Shoma Lahiri try a hand at the competition for the teachers.

There were some treats also for students and teachers. The best part of the event was the visits by our heads, Manika Ma’am, Manisha Ma’am, Madhur Ma’am, Anjali Ma’am and Shoma Ma’am. Their presence and encouragement has left an impact to not only give our best but also the impetus to perform even better.

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Roald Dahl 100th Birthday Bash

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 Image result for roald dahl

 I have been so caught up with l things at the library past 2 months that I could not write a post. A lot has happened since and the hard work paid off when I saw the students visit the Library more frequently. They are in anticipation for what next.  In the month of September the biggest event ever was organised: ROALD DAHL 100th BIRTHDAY BASH.

Roald Dahl (13 September 1916 – 23 November 1990)

There isn’t a child or adult who has not read at least one book by the famous storyteller. His stories touch everyone across ages, be it “Matilda”, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”, The Twits”, the list can go on. And when it’s time to celebrate his birthday and that too his centenary what better than to have a birthday bash in the LRC.

Thus, we at LRC decided to have a week long celebration so that children and staff alike can get some time and spent a few moments to remember the fabulous storyteller. Golden ticket invites were mailed to everyone inviting them to the LRC and participate in some fun activities. The anticipation was set in few days before the event. Students were filled with eagerness to do the fun activities.

As part of fun celebrations, we had set up worksheets ranging from word search to poster making, designing chocolate wrapper, and more. But the most loved was the BFG ears.

We also had our first ever collaborative lesson in the LRC, thanks to Natasha Ma’am and Tanvi Ma’am. They had a lesson about ‘Autobiography and Biography’ in their respective English classes. Using the celebration as the backdrop, each had the class in the Library. There was a reading session by the teacher which was thoroughly enjoyed by the students. And we were met with requests from students to have more such classes in the LRC. As the LRC gave them the ambience, learning seemed more fun. There was also an impromptu skit performed by the students. Many students attempted the fun worksheets and also took some home J.

Many teachers also expressed interest in conducting such collaborative lesson in the future. In all this was a rewarding experience for all of us, as we got the chance to celebrate the birthday of this magnificent author and also have fun collaborating for the same.

Do visit the link and checkout the awesome book reading by Natasha Ma’am, and a funny impromptu skit by the students. Watch and enjoy.

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