Mommy, Where do babies come from? Dr. Robert Roper

A sweet and endearing story about the dilemma a mother faces when her young child tries to pacify her curiosity about childbirth or where babies come from!!

Even the most courageous and self-assured of parents can find themselves in a difficult situation when faced with this question. The Herculean task is to provide a scientific response to that question rather than a fantastical explanation that young children can easily understand. And this book provides a lovely response to that question. This is the ideal story for all children searching for a solution to this grand, age-old question, complete with brilliantly rendered, vibrant graphics and the sporadic use of rhyme schemes.

A narrative like this can help prevent children from learning the wrong things about a subject as important and delicate as this one and is ideal for parents to share with their young children about ideas like pregnancy, the birth of babies, etc.

And I adored the end of the book’s clever cliffhanger, which left room for a potential sequel. Having said all this, I gave this book three stars for a few reasons. The story is initially told in a poem-and-prose combination, which lessened its overall impact. If the story had been written as a proper short story, it would have been more impactful. Second, there was a lot of new language presented (for example, enunciated, oxygenated, swaddled, amniotic, etc.), some of which may be challenging for young children to read and understand at an early age. Despite being a children’s book, the copy I received also contained a few grammatical issues that gave the book a very amateurish and raw appearance. Kudos to the illustrator who did a magnificent job in bringing the text to life.

I received an advance review copy for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily.

Advertisement

Published by avid reader

Words do not describe a person. I am many things and yet nothing. I am an avid reader, reading her way through the pages of life. Some stories warm the heart and yet others have let me dry. I am a result of my life, and yet my life is part a result of me. Don't try to figure me.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: