Tag Archives: books

Lanka’s princess: Kavita Kanè

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Lanka's Princess

Lanka’s princess by Kavita Kanè is about Surpanakha and how individual choices and mistakes they lead to can shape the destinies of those associated with us.

My memory and knowledge of Surpanakha is dependent on the reading of Ramayana while in school , and watching the epic serial on Doordarshan. Even then I was struck by the independent streak in her and thought that the punishment meted out to her was very harsh in comparison to her offence. So when I came across this book my curiosity knew no bounds.

It is an epic task to write a mythological fiction from the point of view of a character who has been maligned and vilified as an ugly monster. All knowledge about her is just that she is Ravan’s sister and when she is disfigured by Lakshman , a war is waged to avenge the act. The essence of the book is the choice Surpanakha makes and the unfolding of the events thereafter. Our choices define which part of our nature we allow to rule our minds. And that is the poignant within each of us. A small anecdote from the Puranas would make it clearer.

When the world was being created, the Devas and Asuras went to Sage Prajapati to understand the meaning of Atman, or the self. The first answer that he gave was a simple one. The Asuras accepted it and left with the confidence that they now had the power to use this knowledge as a weapon. But the Devas, led by Lord Indra were not satisfied with the answer. They kept cross-questioning the sage trying to grasp the complete significance and debating the ideas. This small anecdote from the Puranas defines the essence of an Asura – impatient, hungry for power and impulsive. One can also conclude from here that there is an Asura and a Deva within each of us. There is an Asura which always hungry and never satiated and a Deva which keeps questioning so as not to to be distracted fro the right path. It is our choice of the self that determines the events in our life.

The book opens with Krishna, who upon seeing Kubja, the hunchbacked woman of Mathura, recognises her as a reincarnation of Surpanakha. He reveals to her that he himself is Ram, now born as Krishna and has come to her to rectify the grave misdeed he committed in his previous life – of rejecting her. He begins to narrate Surpanakha’s story from the time she was born as the youngest child of Rishi Vishravas and his second wife Kaikesi. She was born Meenakshi – the one with the fish-shaped eyes. Since her birth she is rejected by her mother as an ugly and useless being. Her life as a kid at her father, Rishi Vishravas’ ashram was desolate, where she is neglected and overshadowed by her brothers. Even as Lanka’s Princess,she is again neglected and side-lined; It is only when she weds and becomes a wife and a mother does she find love and a sense of belonging.

And when all that is lost all that is left behind is simmering angst and bitterness. The later incidents and experiences keep fueling her inner desire for revenge, even at the cost of those few that she loves. She sets into motion the events that finally lead to Lanka’s war and the downfall of her entire race.

Alongside, there is unraveling of events leading to the rise of Ravan as King of Lanka and the ensuing effect it brings on his family, more predominantly Surpanakha’s life. The reader may sympathize with her for being the neglected child, while at the same time despising her for her vengeful tactics. The author portrays her not as a good or bad character, but simply as a misunderstood woman who, in her own eyes, is merely righting the wrong done to her when her one chance at happiness has been taken away.

The timeline is fast and keeps readers on tenterhooks such that you do not lose interest. In true Ramayana style, the author raises underlying questions about right and wrong, good and evil, gender discrimination, and women’s rights. An example of this is the confrontation between Surpanakha and Sita. The very attempt by Surpanakha to tempt Ram was unbeknownst at that time where women were not expected to be sexually active and and open about their own desires. Her boldness is a stark opposite to Sita’s meekness and it comes across vividly in every page where she clearly expresses her desires.

To summarize, Lanka’s Princess may be a mythological retelling of events. However in today’s day and age, when women are still subjected to various forms of discrimination, the author puts the spotlight on a woman’s individuality, her sensuality and sexuality, her choices and her desires, which the society wishes to keep hidden behind curtains.

As one reads the book, one cannot help but ponder whether we happen to identify the Asuras and Danavas that exist among us in the form of molesters, murderers, rapists, thieves, etc. Can we look into the mirror and see ourselves as we truly are, not black or white, but grey also when the demons within us shouts ‘tit-for-tat’ when faced with discord.  What Lanka’s Princess will leave you with is a food for thought. You will spend days thinking whether Ram and Lakshman have been on a pedestal due to worth or the male dominated society list virtues only for womenfolk to follow.

 

 

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Beyond books and walls: What it takes to be a 21st century school librarian

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From connecting with parents and students to keeping up with the latest technologies, there is a whole lot more to the job than stamping due dates and lending books.

A few days ago, while going back home in metro, a fellow female passenger and I got talking. And in between the talk we shared what we do for a living. The moment I said I worked as librarian in a school, she smiled blissfully and remarked that I was lucky to have such a relaxed and comfortable job. Upon hearing this I asked what she meant by her remark. Lo and behold! what I heard next was just the stereotype people possess of the nature of a librarian’s job. For her all I, did was lend books to students in school and shush them when they talk. And the most painful was that I get to sit all day in a comfortable chair with tea on the side. Really!!!!

Is that how I work? Well my friend the answer is no. I do not get to sit on a chair or sip tea all day. Leave alone rest. My day does not merely involve stamping books. I do much more and I am proud of it. I did not choose this job so that I would be having an easy work to do. And yet who am I to get upset because if I stopped the next person walking by on the street and asked them what our jobs as librarians involve, I’d be willing to bet that their first answer would be stamping books. This is because the experience you all had of librarians is of the frontline, the old lady with glasses who kept books locked in cupboards and looked down upon you if your shoes so much as even squeaked. But dear friends have you ever spared a thought how the books get on to the shelves and ready for you to borrow? There is no magic behind it, but behind the scenes there are teams of librarians working to make this happen in universities and colleges. But in schools the job is carried out single handily by the librarian, or if the school infrastructure supports he/ she might have an assistant. Other than that, we ourselves do all the behind the scene from selecting the books for purchase, to processing the orders and later create the bibliographic records that make it possible for you to find the book in the library catalogue and then on the shelves.

I am not here to glorify my job or to argue. I only want you all to see us in the true light. For years, we have plodded to receive the status we enjoy now. And a lot of hands have worked towards making this job reach a level where we are not lesser than our teaching counterparts. No, I have no issues against. I have been a teacher myself, but it is disheartening to see them remark about the librarians’ job as being a job that requires no specific qualification or specialisation and can be done anyone. I was horrified when they said that it’s a job anyone can do effortlessly as there is no level expertise needed.

And the expression was priceless when I informed that we do possess degrees to qualify as a librarian. Not many of my teacher friends were aware. And that’s the level of ignorance behind one of the oldest professions. The fault lies on our part as well because many librarian do not engage themselves beyond books and thus the stereotype continues.

But for me books are only one aspect of what libraries and librarians are about. Librarianship is a people profession. Our job is to connect people with the information they are seeking, whatever format that may take. At their heart, all library jobs have a central purpose: to help people access and use information, for education, for work, or for pleasure. In all library roles, irrespective of place and institution, customer service and communication skills are important. If anyone ever thought they’d become a librarian because they liked books or reading, they would be disillusioned if they did not also like people too. Libraries of all kinds are keen to demonstrate their value to as wide an audience as possible, and to open access to all significant resources that they hold.

In the digital age, with information explosion becoming a common term and every information becoming available online, there is a proclivity to say that libraries and librarians are redundant. But this is not the case. Information available online is often of dubious origin and there is still a wealth of information behind paywalls that can only be accessed by those who have paid. I have helped many students and teachers who have used search engines for their research and projects and come to the library perplexed because they cannot find the information they want or are rather baffled by the overflow of information pertaining to a topic. If anything, the internet has added to the range of services libraries provide and in turn this has also increased the variety of roles available to librarians.

As well as being good communicators with people and dynamic adopters and exploiters of technological developments, librarians need to have detailed specialist subject knowledge to pass on to library users. Our job now includes providing training to show people how to search for information and evaluate the same. These information skills sessions are now expanding to include digital literacies such as cyber safety, the use of social media sites and online collaboration tools.

There is no standard route into librarianship: librarians have first degrees across the whole spectrum of subjects. To become a professionally qualified librarian we also need a masters qualification in librarianship or information science. An introduction to librarianship can be gained through a graduate degree.  A year as a graduate trainee can be useful but it is not a requirement for a place on a postgraduate programme.

I have a job that goes beyond the school walls as I am in constant touch with teachers and students as and when they need any help. As a librarian, my job requires that I be available to them as much as possible. Last month I gave a workshop on Referencing and Citation. This required me to do a lot of reading and research so that the information I communicated was accurate and current. After the research, I was engaged in assembling the information and resources I gathered. Presentations and handouts were prepared keeping in mind the guidelines and student friendly. It took me weeks to prepare for it, as my mistake would cause the students lose marks in their research work. And people consider my job to be cakewalk.

My intention is not to belittle the teaching profession. But friends please be considerate when you happen to meet a librarian. We are not sitting idle all day. The 21st century librarian is more like an information officer who needs to updated and always abreast with the latest in information, books and technology. And this necessitates that we read and keep ourselves up on our surrounding. Nevertheless, we keep doing our work behind the curtains, but it does hurt when people deride our work. Every profession has its share of hardships and bounty, but it is not often that we give each their due.

Yes, teachers have lesson plans to prepare, report cards to write and much more. But we, the librarian work no less. We too have classes but our teaching is not limited to curriculum. We act as aide to your teaching and assist the students study and evaluate information, build up on knowledge and open the horizons for you. Just like your work, our work also requires hours of planning and hard work. Like preparing reading lists, deciding on age appropriate resources for their projects, guiding them in selection of collaboration tools and technology best suited for their need. And this is not easy for us. It involves lot of enquiry, research and assembling of information from the ocean to find that one drop that would quench the need of the user.

We have moved beyond books and walls, and moved ahead, just as information is not limited to books anymore. Our names have changed also, we are called information officer, information specialist, teacher librarian, information and media specialist, and many more. And with the change in the names our role and duty have also changed, become more extensive. We perform research, evaluation, investigation, exploration, curation, referencing, examination. I could go on and the list would only get longer. With the transformation in education system and advancements in technology, our jobs have evolved to extend beyond books. My job is not limited to stamping alone, I am an information officer trying my best to help students search information and evaluate its authenticity and suitability for their work.

So, friends I am not just a librarian, I am the librarian who works behind the scene to ensure you get what you come looking for. The next time you visit a library do pass a smile and give a second to appreciate our work.

Roald Dahl 100th Birthday Bash

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 I have been so caught up with l things at the library past 2 months that I could not write a post. A lot has happened since and the hard work paid off when I saw the students visit the Library more frequently. They are in anticipation for what next.  In the month of September the biggest event ever was organised: ROALD DAHL 100th BIRTHDAY BASH.

Roald Dahl (13 September 1916 – 23 November 1990)

There isn’t a child or adult who has not read at least one book by the famous storyteller. His stories touch everyone across ages, be it “Matilda”, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”, The Twits”, the list can go on. And when it’s time to celebrate his birthday and that too his centenary what better than to have a birthday bash in the LRC.

Thus, we at LRC decided to have a week long celebration so that children and staff alike can get some time and spent a few moments to remember the fabulous storyteller. Golden ticket invites were mailed to everyone inviting them to the LRC and participate in some fun activities. The anticipation was set in few days before the event. Students were filled with eagerness to do the fun activities.

As part of fun celebrations, we had set up worksheets ranging from word search to poster making, designing chocolate wrapper, and more. But the most loved was the BFG ears.

We also had our first ever collaborative lesson in the LRC, thanks to Natasha Ma’am and Tanvi Ma’am. They had a lesson about ‘Autobiography and Biography’ in their respective English classes. Using the celebration as the backdrop, each had the class in the Library. There was a reading session by the teacher which was thoroughly enjoyed by the students. And we were met with requests from students to have more such classes in the LRC. As the LRC gave them the ambience, learning seemed more fun. There was also an impromptu skit performed by the students. Many students attempted the fun worksheets and also took some home J.

Many teachers also expressed interest in conducting such collaborative lesson in the future. In all this was a rewarding experience for all of us, as we got the chance to celebrate the birthday of this magnificent author and also have fun collaborating for the same.

Do visit the link and checkout the awesome book reading by Natasha Ma’am, and a funny impromptu skit by the students. Watch and enjoy.

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Auggie & Me: Three wonder stories by R.J. Palacio

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I had read Wonder as it was part of the recommended list I saw in my school. And it held me captive from the first word. Wonder told the story of August, a boy having craniofacial deformity. But the second book Auggie & Me tells the story from three different perspectives of Julian (the guy who bullied August), Christopher(his childhood best friend) and Charlotte (one of his schoolmates). It is really quite interesting the way everyone sees the situation in his or her way. Is Julian really a bully? Is Christopher right to hide Auggie from his new friends? Is Charlotte ‘nice’ enough to August or is she just pretending?

The first story, Julian’s Chapter, is about Auggie’s school bully, Julian, and his point of view. For him, he hasn’t been bullying August, instead August has been stealing his friends, giving him nightmares and terrorising his reputation in the schoolyard. Julian feels left out from his social network by Auggie’s arrival. And the resulting anger and frustration comes out without understanding that his actions could not only hurt but deeply wound Auggie. Nevertheless he realises his fault and makes amends. That’s what I like  the most because kids are like that. They do not harp on the feelings for too long, unlike adults who can brood for long.

The second story, Pluto, is from August’s best friend Christopher’s way of seeing things. He grew up with Auggie, so his face isn’t anything weird to him. He only first realised that his friend was anything different to every other kid his age when he was four years old, and from there he was in a sort of pickle – be loyal to his life-long friend or be teased mercilessly by his new school friends?A question that many kids face in their lives when they shift schools.

The third story in this collection is called Shing-A-Ling, and is written from the opinions of Charlotte, a girl who was chosen to introduce August to his new school. It examines her social life, and the different decisions she made, some of them relating to August, others not. We have all experienced one such person who is a teacher’s pet and thus happens to do things which they would not do otherwise.

This collection of the three stories is not only thought-provoking but also draws our attention to the fact that we bring up our children in a very protected manner, which renders them defenseless and clueless when faced with harsh realities of life. We should bring up our children to be strong in both mind and body. Just as we feed their body, we should also feed their mind to be open vessels receptive to every learning experience.The book will encourage readers to see classmates, friends, and family in a new light. It is more of a spin-off than a sequel to the much-acclaimed Wonder and digs deep into themes of kindness, friendship, accountability, and integrity with a deft understanding of middle school social drama.

 Auggie & Me in a nutshell follows three students in vastly different circumstances learning important lessons about relationships: Julian confronts his own cruelty and his enabler parents, Christopher acknowledges his selfishness and the work needed to stay close to important friends and family, and Charlotte expands her circle to embrace new friends.

What is heart warming is author R.J. Palacio’s gift for understanding the pressures of middle school. As in Wonder, some characters and situation seem a little too shiny and happy to be true. But they’re presented with such sincerity and faith in the basic goodness of people, it’s hard to take issue with it. So go for it, no matter what your age.

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Beyond the Obvious: 6th August

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Slight breeze welcomed me as I stepped outside to board an auto towards the Metro Station. Grey clouds started appeared veiling the sun that tried to outshine itself. But no such luck. Wet breeze kissed my cheeks as I got down at the Metro Station. I got worried seeing the clouds pursuing me, but I was determined not to let my spirits dampen. After all,  I was going to a storytelling workshop which could not only raise my spirits higher but could give wings to my imagination.

I got down at the venue and registered myself. And within seconds there was a drop on my cheek and then the slow trickle gave way to a downpour. We were all seated in the comfortable auditorium waiting for the magic to happen. And boy was  I in for a ride. Since the moment Simi Ma’am came on stage we were all spellbound and held captive by her words and actions. I for one could not take my eyes off her. She seemed to transform into this mystical fairy who sprinkled fairy dust upon us. And we were all transported to a faraway land.

She had us all in raptures. She began the session with a riddle that caught everyone’s attention. It was meant to illustrate the working of the human mind, how it is conditioned in a particular manner based on physical appearances. She very cleverly expressed how the human mind perceives things visually. The answer to the riddle brought forth several versions, which rightfully demonstrated to each his/her perception. Thus, we should delve deeper when we perceive a child and not judge or dismiss them based on their appearances or even the first encounter. Each child is like a flower that opens petal by petal to reveal his/her beauty.

 To further expand on that thought she narrated an incident which a few years back had surfaced in FB. It was about a boy who expresses his gratitude towards his teacher by asking her to fill her the place of his mother at his wedding since his mother was long dead. Had it not been for the efforts from the teacher, the boy would never have made a niche for himself in society. She as a teacher made that extra effort to know the child when he started to drop in his performance. She tracked his earlier form profiles and saw that since his mother’s death , the boy had performed bad. She had a change of perception for the boy who till now was judged as difficult and devil’s own. It was that EXTRA effort on the teacher’s part that changed the child’s life, or else he would gone through schooling unnoticed.

Simi Ma’am progressed on to explaining the fine lines of storytelling. She elucidated upon the concept of “Mini Theatre”  and how stories could be used in daily classes and daily life to teach concepts to children. She tell went on to tell another story which taught factorisation concept in easy steps. I was astonished and speechless that a daily routine in the kitchen could have saved me from the agony of my Maths teacher. But alas! I was not lucky enough to have Simi Ma’am unravel the secrets of learning in stories back then.

We were all students in her magical class, and she was slowly producing one gem after another. To my utter surprise she narrated a fascinating story, but she stopped midway, at the climax. And we were all waiting i anticipation for her to go on and end it. But that is when she dropped her genius art: an open ended story allows growth of personality and lets the imagination run riot. the ending of a story is a reflection of the author: his/her observations/discernment.

In the span of just 2 hours she taught me a lot about the art of storytelling and having incorporated them in my daily life with my daughter, I find her to be too eager for story time. The art of story telling is so ancient that one cannot lay a finger to its origin. But yes, its a universal fact that every culture has stories and that is what makes them rich. India is a diverse land that has so many stories to offer that one cannot consume in a lifetime.

My takeaway: Magic of the story is that it enhances productivity skills of speaking and writing and augments the receptive skills of reading and listening.

I am definitely looking forward to another enthralling session with her and become a child one again.

George : Alex Gino

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A lot has been written and spoken about LGBT, transgender, gay and lesbian rights. But has anyone stopped and pondered what if a family member turned out to be any one. Have we really thought how our personal view would be? No, I guess not.

The book has received mixed reviews citing issues like poor style of writing, lack of real plot, poor characterization…and so on. I also found parents to be angry, irate and uncomfortable about the book discussing transgender among kids. Little do they understand that if it is identified earlier the child has much more ease to live life in his/her skin. The early acceptance allows parents the space and advantage of being prepared for the reactions and difficulties they’ll have to face.

For me as an educator, I would say the book hits right in the eye. The book is a children’s novel about a young transgender girl written by Alex Gino. George, a fourth grader, dreams of playing Charlotte, the female spider, rather than Wilbur, the male pig, in her school’s production of Charlotte’s Web. George auditions for the part by reciting Charlotte’s lines to her teacher, who thinks that George is playing a joke on her. While initially upset, George refuses to participate in the play but volunteers for stage crew. After George comes out as transgender to her best friend Kelly, the two devise a plan for George to play Charlotte during the evening performance of Charlotte’s Web.

Life’s simple moments have been presented with the same simplicity such that the reader experiences each event personally. Certain moments in the book are so well written that they hold on to your hearts and play with them till you happen to shed a silent happy tear. ike when how George thinks about holding the ladder for her best friend, Kelly, after Kelly gets cast in the high-flying role George wants: She “would be Charlotte’s Charlotte, deeply hidden in the shadows.” Elsewhere, the use of  escalating variations on an everyday word — “Oh,” then “Ohhh,” then “Ohhhhhhhhh” brilliantly depict the dawning way George’s older brother reacts to learning that his little bro is actually his kid sis. These moments are drawn with elegant restraint, even if other aspects of the book — like how George’s mom watches soap operas and George’s brother refers to “dirty magazines” — feel dated.

Though the use of theater backdrop to reveal self is an age old concept that happens to inspire people in real life as well. Its a clever technique wherein the child can safely unveil the real self and yet not be held an outcast. Theater allows both kids and adults alike to “be” other people and yet the opposite also stands true. Here one can be true because theater is the only place where we can be ourselves and also be accepted for the truth.

Also the author Gino’s choice of “Charlotte’s Web” resonates for another reason: Anyone who thinks children won’t believe that a boy knows he’s really a girl need only pick up “Charlotte” to be reminded that a barnful of talking animals never confused anyone.

 After reading “George,” I too pulled out my own  edition of E.B. White’s beloved novel and read this line: “Wilbur felt queer to be outside his fence, with nothing between him and the big world.” It brought to mind the ending of “George”: Kelly lets Melissa (George’s name for herself) ransack her wardrobe to get dolled up for a girls’ day on the town. But unlike Wilbur, Melissa is thrilled to venture outside her fence, where she feels like her truest self. Having found acceptance from Kelly, her mother and her brother, Melissa no longer needs to hide under boy clothes. She is free to be MELISSA.
Its a sweet, moving, profound novel with an insightful portrayal of a transgender child who comes to realise own gender identity and then surges ahead to connect with self on real terms.
You can listen to the author talking briefly about GEORGE and reading a short excerpt at TeachingBooks.

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Wonder by R J Palacio

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Well this book has been on my must read list for quite some time. It was recommended to me by a dear friend and I also found it in the recommended list for middle school readers. I just happened to google it to get an answer about the hype surrounding the book. Wonder has been trumpeted as “a book that has made grown men weep” and its justified. The plot not just pulled but yanked the strings of my heart.

I read how Palacio came to write this book. Palacio was compelled to write Wonder after fearing that her younger son (who at the time was three years old) would react badly after noticing a girl with facial birth defects was sitting beside him as they were waiting in line to buy ice cream. Palacio attempted to remove her son from the situation so as not to upset her or the girl’s family but ended up only intensifying the situation. Natalie Merchant’s song “Wonder” had her realize that the incident could teach a valuable lesson. Palacio was inspired by Merchant’s lyrics and she began writing.

Plot: August “Auggie” Pullman is a 10-year-old living in the fictional neighborhood of North River Heights in upper Manhattan. He has a rare medical facial deformity, which he refers to as “mandibulofacial dysostosis”, more commonly known as Treacher Collins syndrome and a cleft palate. Due to numerous surgeries, Auggie had been home-schooled by his mother, but his parents decide to enroll him in Beecher Prep, a private school, for the start of middle school in the fall.

Auggie visits Beecher with his mother and meets the school director Mr. Tushman, along with three students: Jack Will, Julian Albans, and Charlotte Cody. Although extremely self-conscious and scared of being around kids his own age, Auggie gradually gets used to and even begins to enjoy school. He befriends Jack as well as a girl named Summer Dawson, who sits with him during lunch when no one else would. Julian, however, barely conceals his disgust at Auggie’s appearance, avoids him and often makes hurtful remarks. He bullies Auggie and hates him for the way he looks.

During Halloween, when Auggie didn’t feel like wearing his Boba Fett costume, he wore a “Bleeding Scream” costume instead. Unrecognized at school, he overhears Jack telling Julian in homeroom he would “kill himself” if he looked like Auggie. Feeling hurt and betrayed by Jack, Auggie wants to quit school, but his 15-year-old sister Via convinces him not to. Auggie confides the incident to Summer. Jack notices that Auggie has become quiet and distant; he asks Summer why, and though she won’t divulge the secret, she says “Bleeding Scream” as a hint. At first, he isn’t aware that Auggie heard of what he said and believes that he’s just avoiding him for no reason, so he starts avoiding him too. In December, however, Jack realizes Auggie had overheard what he said and realizes that he also heard that Jack was pretending to be friends with him, leaving Jack shocked. In science class, Auggie and Jack are partners for a project. When Julian asks the teacher if he could be Jack’s partner instead, Jack declines. But when Julian calls Auggie a “freak,” Jack punches Julian in the face in retaliation. As a result, Jack is suspended for two days for his actions. Knowing that Julian would get them both in trouble for bad-mouthing Auggie, Jack does not tell Mr. Tushman what happened. Julian’s mother says that Auggie does not belong in Beecher Prep, as it is not an “inclusion school”, but Mr. Tushman and everyone else disagrees with her. Jack sincerely apologizes to Auggie, saying he didn’t mean to say the stuff he said about him, and they become friends again.

Throughout the rest of the school year, Auggie faces many obstacles, mostly due to ringleader Julian encouraging his “gang” to avoid and isolate Auggie and Jack. (Courtesy: Wikipedia).

I am not divulging the whole plot here because it should be read and yes shed tears like I did. The book has some very important lessons to takeaway: kindness, tolerance, courage in the face of difficulty, family bonds, acceptance and the most important acceptance of self.That’s what the lead August teaches us all. He keeps his head high despite being hurled with abuses and nasty remarks. He smiles back even when he feels his heart is being pounded. 

I recommend it to not only kids but to adults as well, because we too need to learn to be tolerant of those who are different or hold opinions that are against our own. The space to respect and tolerate personal space has to be taught to kids when they are young. These deformities are a rare sight, but the deformities that we have even as normal people should be discussed at large.

Those who wish to read eBook of the same please see:

http://www.lakewoodcityschools.org/userfiles/2658/Wonder%20-%20comp%203_8%20-%20audiopdf.pdf.

Also watch : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXtyQZLzg9M

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